Saturday, June 23, 2018

enRoute editor Jean-Francois Legare named editor of the year by CSME

Jean-Francois Legare of Air Canada enRoute was named editor of the year at the annual Editors' Choice Awards presented June 21st  at a social held in Toronto by the Canadian Society of Magazine Editors (CSME). It was the first time a custom magazine editor had won the honour.  Style at Home, Canadian Living, Western Living and Vancouver Magazine also took home a couple of awards each. 
Here is the full list of winners:
  • Magazine of the Year, Small Circulation: Vancouver Magazine, Anicka Quin
  • Magazine of the Year, Medium Circulation: Western Living, Anicka Quin
  • Magazine of the Year, Large Circulation: Canadian Living, Erin McLaughlin
  • Magazine of the Year, Trade: Precedent, Melissa Kluger
  • Magazine of the Year, Custom: Air Canada enRoute, Jean-Francois Legare
  • Best Tablet: Style at Home, Chris Bond
  • Best Web Editorial: vanmag.com, Kaitlyn Funk
  • Best Front of Book: Canadian Living, Erin McLaughlin & Western Living, Anicka Quin (*Tie)
  • Jim Cormier Award for Display Writing Winners: Style at Home, Erin McLaughlin
  • Best Art Integration  Winner: Style at Home, Karen Paddon
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    Former Canada's History publisher named to board of National Capital Commission

    Deborah Morrison, the former publisher of Canada's History magazine and, most recently, president and CEO of Experiences Canada, has been appointed to a four-year term on the board of the National Capital Commission of Canada. The appointment is effective June 25 and was made by the Minister of Canadian Heritage, the Honourable Mélanie Joly.

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    Thursday, June 21, 2018

    A picture worth quite a few words

    TIME Magazine's July 2 issue will be a photo illustration incorporating a photo of U.S. president Donald Trump and a two-year old Honduran girly weeping as her mother was detained in McAllen, Texas. The little girl's photo was taken by John Moore, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer for Getty Images.
    “This one was tough for me. As soon as it was over, they were put into a van. I had to stop and take deep breaths,” Moore told TIME Tuesday, describing his reaction to the scene...“All I wanted to do was pick her up. But I couldn’t.”

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    Tuesday, June 19, 2018

    Mag world view: Grow or go up in smoke?; 22 MPA lessons; Maine finds new owners; News on social media falls; American Media buys teen & celeb titles from Bauer

    Thursday, June 14, 2018

    St. Joseph Media buys Totem custom publisher from Yellow Pages Ltd.

    St. Joseph Media has bought Totem from Yellow Pages Ltd., and plans to roll it under its custom publishing division, Strategic Content Labs. Among the custom publications Totem produces are the quarterly CAA Magazine with combined readership of 4.5 million. Other Totem clients include  The Hockey News and The London Magazine. The company was founded in 2008 as Redwood Custom Communications, and  was for a time owned by TC Media and renamed Totem and sold  in 2008 to Yellow Pages in 2016. 
    “We look forward to working with Totem and its clients to not only maintain the great level of service being provided, but to supplement it with the expanded capabilities available through Strategic Content Labs and St. Joseph’s complete range of business offerings,’’ said St. Joseph Media President Douglas Kelly.
    Launched four years ago, Strategic Content Labs produces publications in the consumer products, travel, culture, association, university and college, and government sectors. Its clients have included Grey Goose, Greater Toronto Airport Authority, National Music Centre, University of Guelph and Heritage Canada.

    St. Joseph Media’s stable of consumer brands includes Toronto Life and FASHION Magazine.

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    Rogers is laying off 75 full-time publishing and digital staff

    [This post has been updated] Rogers Communications is cutting its publishing and digital staff by a third -- with a total of 75 full-time employees laid off. 

    The casualties included Steve Maich, the senior vice-president of digital publishing and content and Lianne George, the editor-in-chief of Chatelaine magazine, [Update: both of whom resigned.] (It may seem ironic that George was honoured just last week as the Editor Grand Prix at the National Magazine Awards.)

    According to the Rogers announcement the layoffs are the latest effort to overhaul the company's magazine strategy, yet another attempt to scale back its publishing division in the face of a loss of ad revenues, although the company said the changes won't mean any titles discontinued or have an impact on the quality of content or frequency of print issues. (Rogers ended the print editions of Canadian Business, Flare, MoneySense and Sportsnet magazines in 2016 and reduced the print frequency of Maclean's, Chatelaine and Today's Parent.) 
    “The publishing industry continues to face challenges, as print declines outpace digital growth,” Andrea Goldstein, senior director of communications for Rogers Media, said in a statement. “We have reorganized our digital content and publishing structure to reflect the headwinds the industry is facing and make the business sustainable.”

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    Tuesday, June 12, 2018

    Mag world view: Scots wha' harass; Time UK rebrands; wrong way newsstands?; Digital subs displace ads

    Monday, June 11, 2018

    Western Living and Vancouver acquired by Canada Wide Media

    Two of western Canada's largest and most successful magazines  -- Vancouver magazine and Western Living -- have been acquired by Canada Wide Media. (Canada Wide publishes, among other things, BCBusiness, TV Week and the digital lifestyle title BCLiving.)
    “These are two of the most prestigious magazines in Western Canada, and we are thrilled to add these exemplary brands to our portfolio,” said Peter Legge, chair and CEO of Canada Wide in a story on BCBusiness. “The addition of these titles to our stable of magazines gives us the largest reach in all of the West.”
    With an annual readership of 314,000, Vancouver has been the city’s preeminent publication for more than 50 years. Western Living, which has an annual readership of 287,000, focuses on home design and décor, food and wine, and travel.  
    The Legge family has owned Canada Wide for more than 40 years, establishing it as Western Canada’s largest independent media company.
    CEO Peter Legge and president Samantha Legge
    This transaction brings to an end the relatively shortlived ownership of the two magazines by Yellow Pages Homes Ltd. The two magazines had been left somewhat adrift when TC Media sold its eastern consumer magazines to Quebecor's TVA Group. They were picked up by Yellow Pages in May 2015 with the goal of augmenting the lifestyle strengths in the marketplace.

    Yellow Pages is the official directories publisher of Bell Canada, Telus, Bell Aliant, MTS Allstream and a number of other companies. It describes itself as the leading digital company in Canada and owns and manages a slew of trademarked  online directories:  YellowPages.ca,  PagesJaunes.caCanada411.ca, and RedFlagDeals.com  as well as CanadaPlus.ca  and a network of seven local city sites, including MontrealPlus.caQuebecPlus.ca,  TorontoPlus.ca,  CalgaryPlus.ca,  EdmontonPlus.ca,  OttawaPlus.ca and  VancouverPlus.ca.

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    Wednesday, June 06, 2018

    Quote, unquote: Impasse-able funding

    “This Canada Council policy is going to be problematic for any Canadian publisher who wants to do something meaningful in the way of succession.If I can’t do it with Ken Whyte, I don’t think anyone can do it. Somebody needs to explain that to the Canada Council.”
    -- Publisher Tim Inkster commenting in a story in the Globe and Mail about why a deal to sell The Porcupine's Quill t0 Ken Whyte is in jeopardy because of an apparent impasse about core funding from the Canada Council. 

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    Friday, June 01, 2018

    The Site receives Magazine Grand Prix from the National Magazine Awards

    The Site magazine captured the coveted overall Magazine Grand Prix award at the National Magazine Awards Friday night in Toronto. The award honours essentially "best in show",  the magazine that delivers the best consistency, packaging, and reader experience; that demonstrates overall excellence in bringing teams together to create a spectacular product; is aspirational and inspiring, helping to take magazine media to the next level. The jury said of the magazine:
    “The Site Magazine impresses readers with the consistency of its content and design. Though highly specialized, this audacious magazine captures the essence of contemporary publishing through a conceptual approach that illuminates our time in an intelligent, deep and original way. The result is a great reader experience on every page, one that is truly deserving of the Magazine Grand Prix.”
    The Site was also named Best Magazine: Art & Literary and won Silver in the category of Best Editorial Package for its whole-issue package titled “Future Legacies.” 
    For the 2017 awards year, 197 Canadian magazines entered the National Magazine Awards, which are managed by the National Media Awards Foundation, submitting the work of more than 2,000 writers, editors, photographers, illustrators, art directors and other creators. The NMAF’s 150 volunteer judges nominated a total of 208 submissions from 81 different Canadian publications for awards in 29 written and visual, editorial and best magazine categories. 
    Category results in the Grand Prix: Best Magazine were  
    • Best Magazine: General Interest
      • Gold: L’actualité
      • Honourable Mention: Nouveau Projet and Report on Business
    •  Best Magazine: Lifestyle
      • Gold: Ricardo
      • Honourable Mention: Chatelaine and explore
    • Best Magazine: Service
      • Gold: Best Health
      • Honourable Mention: Rotman Management and Today’s Parent
    • Best Magazine: Fashion & Beauty
      • Gold: FASHION Magazine
      • Honourable Mention: ELLE Canada and S/magazine
    • Best Magazine: Art & Literary
      • Gold: The Site Magazine
      • Honourable Mention: Brick and Inuit Art Quarterly
    •  Best Magazine: Special Interest
      • Gold: Hayo
      • Honourable Mention: Azure and Planète F
    The magazines with the most awards were as follows:
    Magazine
    GOLD
    SILVER
    HM
    L’actualité
    3
    4
    6
    Dînette Magazine
    3
    0
    2
    The Site Magazine
    2
    1
    0
    Toronto Life
    2
    1
    6
    The Walrus
    2
    0
    10
    Maclean’s
    2
    0
    5
    Canadian Geographic
    2
    0
    2
    FASHION Magazine
    1
    1
    7
    L’inconvénient
    1
    1
    1
    Lianne George of Chatelaine 
    named Editor Grand Prix

    New this year, the award for Editor Grand Prix , was presented to Lianne George (right), editor of Chatelaine magazine. Charles Grandmont (L’actualité) and Nicolas Langelier (Nouveau Projet) each received an honourable mention. 
    The award for best new magazine writer, presented to an emerging author whose early work in magazines shows the highest degree of craft and promise, went to Jessica Rose for her piece Lost and Foundpublished in Toronto Life. The National Magazine Awards jury said of the story: 
    “With the suspense and pacing of a great mystery, Rose unwinds her own search for family and belonging with an outstanding, unputdownable rookie effort.”
    Honourable mentions went to Julian Brave NoiseCat (Canadian Geographic), Justin Dallaire (United Church Observer), Christopher Elliott (Outpost Magazine) and Hadiya Roderique (The Walrus).
    Announced previously, the Foundation Award for Outstanding Achievement -- the most prestigious award the industry can offer an individual -- was presented to Joyce Byrne, the publisher of Avenue Calgary and formerly president of the NMAs. magazine-awards.com/oa
    Highlights of the 41st National Magazine Awards:
    The magazines with the most awards were as follows:
    Magazine
    GOLD
    SILVER
    HM
    L’actualité
    3
    4
    6
    Dînette Magazine
    3
    0
    2
    The Site Magazine
    2
    1
    0
    Toronto Life
    2
    1
    6
    The Walrus
    2
    0
    10
    Maclean’s
    2
    0
    5
    Canadian Geographic
    2
    0
    2
    FASHION Magazine
    1
    1
    7
    L’inconvénient
    1
    1

    • The magazine L’actualité won three Gold and four Silver medals. Reporter and columnist Noémi Mercier (the host for the evening) captured Gold for her column “Des gars, des filles.” In the Service Journalism category, L’actualité swept both awards, with journalist Yanick Villedieu taking Gold for “La guerre au sucre” and Mathilde Roy Silver for “Quand Facebook remplit les biberons.” Data journalist Naël Shiab also captured Silver in Investigative Reporting for his story “Marchandises militaires : la grande hypocrisie canadienne,” as did Marc-André Sabourin in the Feature Writing category for “L’école à la chaîne. The magazine art director, Amélie Chamberland, also won silver for Art Direction of a Single Magazine Article for the piece “Changer le monde.” Finally, the publication was named Best General Interest Magazine.
    • Lifestyle magazine Dînette, published by editor and art director Hélène Mallette and publisher and photographer Mathieu Lachapelle, took home three Gold Medals in the categories of Best Editorial Package (the “Salé” issue), Lifestyle Photography (“Les îles Féréo : à la frontière du monde et des saveurs”) and Art Direction Grand Prix (the “Pigment” issue).
    • Toronto Life took home three medals, two golds and one silver. The coveted Best New Magazine Writer title went to emerging writer – and the magazine’s former art director – Jessica Rose, who impressed the judges with her piece “Lost and Found.” As well, writer Raizel Robin won a Gold medal for his investigation into the Toronto South Detention Centre (“The 1-Billion Hellhole”). Finally, Toronto Life captured its third award of the night thanks to Malcolm Johnston’s profile of the Blue Jays’ star third-baseman, titled “Josh Donaldson’s Road to Glory.”
    • The Walrus won two Gold medals in the visual categories of Illustration and Portrait Photography. Visual artist Lauren Tamaki captured Gold for her piece Get the Scissors,as did photographer Sara Hylton in Portrait Photography thanks to her Portraits of Resilience.
    • Maclean’s magazine won two National Magazine Awards, both Gold. Writer Jason Markusoff took home the award for Feature Writing (The New Underground Railroad), and Nancy Macdonald for Short Feature Writing (Waiting for Death in Thunder Bay”).
    • The Canadian Geographic team also took home two Gold Medals. Wade Davis, Nick Walker and Chris Brackley won in the category of One-of-a-Kind Storytelling for their Indigenous languages of Canada Poster Map,and writer Charles Wilkins in the writing category of Long-Form Feature Writing for his story Trash Nation.
    • FASHION Magazines work was recognized twice, as the publication captured a Gold and a Silver Medal. The magazine was named Best Fashion & Beauty Magazine in addition to winning Silver for Cover Grand Prix for 40 Years of Style.
    • The French-language literary publication L’inconvénient captured two awards after receiving its first-ever nominations at the National Magazine Awards. Poet Rosalie Lessard won the Gold Medal in Poetry for her piece “Base-de-roc,” the first time in the history of the National Magazine Awards that a French-language poem has captured the Gold Medal. Meanwhile photographer David Himbert won Silver in Photojournalism and Photo Essay for his Cuban story “Les Cubains et l’après-Fidel.”
    • Five magazines won a National Magazine Award for the first time: Hayo, Inuit Art Quarterly, L’inconvénient, Registered Nurse Journal and The Site Magazine.
    Below are the individual gold and silver awards winners:
    Read more »

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    Thursday, May 31, 2018

    Could selected magazines be "vended" to travellers?

    Photo: (RICHARD LAUTENS / TORONTO STAR)
    Since there now is a book vending machine at Billy Bishop airport on Toronto Islands, could we be too far away from a vending machine for some of Canada's best magazines? For instance, winners at the National Magazine Awards. 

    According to a story in the Toronto Star, there are 20 independent titles available in the machine put in place by Literary Press Group, a collective of about 60 independent Canadian publishers. Carry On Books is a summer-long experiment running from June 1 to Aug. 31. The project was funded by the Canada Book Fund, which is part of the federal Department of Heritage.
    Inspiration for the machine came in part from the Biblio-Mat at The Monkey’s Paw bookshop on Bloor St. W., which provides used books, as well as short story machines in Edmonton and Paris airports that dispense a story for those in need of a quick read.
     “We thought Billy Bishop was the best place to launch a book vending machine because there’s no real entertainment options on the flight,” noted Thomas. “We often see passengers reading the literature on the plane,” [said Christen Thomas, the organization’s executive director.]

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    Tuesday, May 29, 2018

    The Deep, Hakai and The Globe win general excellence in 2018 Digital Publishing Awards

    The awards for general excellence in digital publishing at the Digital Publishing Awards have been made to The Deep (small circulation), Hakai Magazine (medium) and The Globe and Mail (large). The awards were presented Tuesday night by the National Media Awards Foundation, which also presents the National Magazine Awards (this Friday).

    A total of 79 Canadian digital publications participated in the DPAs, in 23 awards categories. 78 individuals served as judges for this year's awards. They nominated 106 entries from 37 different digital publications. 

    Of The Deep, the judges said:
    "They’re doing remarkable work with a very small staff, using their resources intelligently so that each story has the greatest impact. Their mandate—to tell in depth stories based on the East Coast—feels not only necessary, especially with the erosion of local news, but like one that they are well-positioned to carry out, considering their balance of a considered design with engaging stories,” remarked the digital publishing awards jury. “As traditional publishers grapple with diminished capacity, it will take efforts like those of The Deep, to ensure deeper, longer stories are still told and more importantly, heard!”
    Of Hakai, the judges remarks were:
    Hakai is the realization of what a great digital magazine can be. With beautiful imagery, clean design, crisp writing, and well-integrated digital features, Hakai sets the standard for a high-quality digital publication,” said the Digital Publishing Awards jury. “Everything about the site is in support of its content and the reader, as it should be.” Hakai Magazine received six other awards in various categories, including a second gold in Best Online Video - Feature. 
    Of The Globe and Mail, it was said:
    The Globe and Mail team produced an extremely innovative body of work. Their editorial mandate was not only fulfilled, it was surpassed and truly represented the highest of journalistic standards.”  The Globe won gold for best digital design.
    Elizabeth Melito of CBC News was recognized as this year’s recipient of the Emerging Excellence Award. The award honours an individual whose early work in Canadian digital publishing shows the highest degree of craft and promise. The jury said they were 
    “exceptionally impressed by Elizabeth's clear demonstration of leadership and initiative in a large and respected organization like CBC News. She joined CBC News, her first media job, in 2015. In a short time she has earned a high level of respect and responsibility and has developed two custom long-form development tools that have been rolled out nationally at CBC.”
    Brodie Fenlon, the Senior Director of Daily News and Bureaus for the CBC, was the recipient of the 2018 Digital Publishing Leadership Award. The award honours an individual whose career contributions to Canadian digital publishing deserve recognition and celebration.

    Highlights of other winners:
    • Gold winning publications: HuffPost Québec, ICI Radio-Canada Première, The Deep and The Sprawl all captured their first Digital Publishing Awards this year. 
    • The leading publication in this year's Digital Publishing Awards is The Globe and Mail. The “Unfounded” investigation—led by Dennis Choquett, Robyn Doolittle, Laura Blenkinsop, Jeremy Agius, and Michael Pereira—won Gold in both Best Digital Editorial Package and Best News Coverage.
    • Hakai Magazine was also a top-winning publication, receiving two Gold medals, two Silver medals, and three Honourable Mentions. Jude Isabella, the magazine’s editor-in-chief, contributed to three of those winning pieces. 
    • “Canada’s Best New Restaurants 2017,” published in Air Canada enRoute, won two silver medals, in the categories of Best Online Video: Short and Best Digital Editorial Package. 
    • Global News (globalnews.ca) was a two-time winner: “Canada’s #ToxicSecret” was the Gold winner in the Best Social Storytelling category, while “Fire Watch: B.C. Wildfire Coverage” was the Silver winner in the Best News Coverage category. 
    • In addition, Gold winning publications include Canadian Art, CBC News, Global News (globalnews.ca), Hakai Magazine, HuffPost Quebec, ICI Radio-Canada Première, The Globe and Mail, The Sprawl, The Walrus, and TVO.org. 
    • Taking home Silver medals are Air Canada enRoute, BuzzFeed Canada, CBC News, CBC Original Podcasts, Discourse Media, Global News (globalnews.ca), Hakai Magazine, Hazlitt, National Observer, Options politiques, The Globe and Mail, Today’s Parent, Toronto Life, and VICE. 
    To view the winners in all 23 categories live.digitalpublishingawards.ca. Follow the Digital Publishing Awards on Twitter @DPAwards and #DPA18. [Also, a complete list of the results are after the break below]

    Read more »

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